Rainwater Harvesting Project – Inglewood Presbyterian Church

Rainwater Harvesting Project – Inglewood Presbyterian Church

In 2015 the Finn Hill Neighborhood Alliance applied for and received a $15,000 King County Waterworks Grant. The grant’s criteria was that the project supports implementation of low-impact development features that utilize rainwater harvesting working with public and private entities. The Inglewood Presbyterian Church (IPC) located at 7718 NE 141st St, Kirkland, WA is the City of Kirkland emergency preparedness site for Finn Hill and the rainwater harvesting construction site. The project was managed by John Bailey from IPC (contact (425) 823-9334) and completed in October 2017. The primary objective was to recover and utilize as much naturally occurring rainwater as possible for the irrigation of the Finn Hill Neighborhood Gardens and the play fields.

Secondary benefits:
– Improved downstream water quality for fish and habitat restoration
– Improved Storm water control
– Community education and involvement
– Emergency water source

John Bailey

John Bailey

John Bailey: “The benefits are great. The system takes the water from the 1960’s building that designed to run-off onto the parking lot, then down the drive to the street then to the storm system. I learned this water becomes heated as it flows across the asphalt and down the street gutter. In the fall run offs during the Salmon Run the heated water has a negative impact on the salmon. Over half of the 324,000 gallons of rain water we are collecting is no longer being heated up. Go Salmon.”

Inglewood Presbyterian Church (IPC) has 14,000 SF of recoverable rain water roof area. That equals 324,000 gallons of rainwater per year. The average rainfall for the months May thru September is 1.15 inches or 10,500 gallons per month. The monthly need of both the Finn Hill Neighborhood Garden located at the church and the irrigation of the playfield is 6,000 gallons. The harvested rainwater will meet our watering needs even in the dry summer months.

 

The steps below give you an abbreviated scope of the step by step installation process. For a more thorough presentation with images  Please view the PDF 

  1. Leveling and preparing the tank pad base. IPC wanted the tanks located away from the buildings and near the Finn Hill neighborhood gardens.
  2. Tank pad base prior to rock fill. The City of Kirkland upon project review requested the tanks have seismic hold down system in place.  The treated 4 x 6 frames are buried under the tanks for seismic protection with hold down straps.
  3. Delivery of the two – 3,000 gallon rainwater storage tanks to the site.
  4. Trench from New Lift Station #3 to the storage tanks.
  5. Backfilling the 2 inch supply piping from the new lift station #3 to the storage tanks.
  6. Trench from roof drains at existing lift station #1 to new lift station #3.
  7. Crossing of active natural gas line. Call before you dig. CALL 811.
  8. Laying of pipe from existing lift station #1 to new lift station #3.
  9. Diverted existing roof leader line to new lift station #3.
  10. New lift station #3 installed to interrupt existing 6 inch storm line at north end of property. New lift station will supply the rainwater to the rainwater harvesting tanks.
  11. Interior piping of new lift station #3.
  12. Interrupted existing 6 inch storm line.
  13. Diverted rain leader lines.
  14. Lift station pump, valves and backflow device.
  15. New lift station #3 protective enclosure.
  16. Existing lift station #1 protective enclosure.
  17. Existing lift station #2 protective enclosure.
  18. Setting of pipe and valves at storage tanks.
  19. Each tank is to have independent  filtered supply, discharge and overflow protection.
  20. Tank valve and piping.
  21. Freeze and vandal protection.
  22. Tank valve box enclosures prior to removable boardwalk installation.
  23. Total of 20 values are used to control flow and distribution.
  24. Boardwalk and access panels installed at rainwater storage tank farm:  Boardwalk, storage Tanks and vandal protection of valves and filters.
  25. New rainwater distribution pump. Demand pump with pressure tank and control floats.
  26. Protective Enclosure
  27. Rainwater to city water mixing station.
  28. The Finn Hill area is unique in that we can mix the rainwater. We can use 100 % city water or we can use 100 % rainwater or We can blend the two together.

 

 

 

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